Understand Your Wind Mitigation Report

First and foremost there is NO PASS or FAIL for the Wind Mitigation Report.  It is just an evaluation as to the construction of the home to see if you qualify for insurance discounts.  Just because you do not get every discount does not mean your house was built poorly or substandard.  Your house passed the guidelines set by the state of Florida and the present jurisdiction your in.  This form was compromised in 2012, so it did not exist when many of the houses were built, so the builder did not have this form when the houses were built so how could he maximize the discounts?

Once again there is NO PASS or FAIL.  It's just an evaluation of what is present.  It is NOT an INSPECTION report of this company.  It is a report that was established by the Insurance Industry in Florida and we have very specific guidelines to follow and we are subject to have an inspector to follow up right behind us to ensure what we have reported is in fact the exact conditions that we reported.

Lets break it down line by line

OWNER INFORMATION - The heading is just the information that WE HAVE for the client.  It may not be filled out fully, its because we do NOT HAVE the information.  We have put in as much information as we have.  Feel free to add information to this header.

 

Here is an explanation of the Wind Mitigation Form

1. Building Code: This section asks if the building was built In compliance with the 2001 Florida Building Code or if the home is located in a High Velocity Hurricane Zone (HVHZ) that that is built in compliance with the South Florida Building Code of 1994 (SFBC-94). This is determined by the permit application date of the building. The plans were drawn up and approved under the building codes that were in effect at that time. This lets the insurance company know how old and what codes it was built under. There is nothing that can change this other than demolition of the house and rebuild under newer codes.

2. Roof Covering: This section is asking for the application date of when the roof covering was installed or the (2001 Florida Building Code) FBC/MDC (Miami-Dade County) product approval numbers for the roof covering installed. If a roof was replaced and no permit was pulled there is no verification of what codes this was replaced under, therefore the date will be either the last recorded permit pulled for the roof or the original installation during the time of original construction. To qualify for option A. 2001 Building Code the permit application date has to be on or after 03/01/2002. To qualify for option B. Miami Dade approval listing current at the time of the installation or for HVHZ only, permit applications date after 09/01/1994 and before 03/02/2002.

3. Roof Deck Attachment: The weakest form has to be documented. The form pretty much describes it. This is document what type attachment is used to hold on the roof sheathing and how much uplift it will withstand.

Option A: Plywood/Oriented strand board (OSB) roof sheathing attached to the roof truss/rafter (spaced a maximum of 24" inches o.c.)by staples or 6d nails spaced at 6" along the edge and 12" in the field. -OR- Batten decking supporting wood shakes or wood shingles. -OR- Any system of screws, nails, adhesives, other deck fastening system or truss/rafter spacing that has an equivalent mean uplift less than that required for Options B or C below.

Option B: Plywood/OSB roof sheathing with a minimum thickness of 7/16"inch attached to the roof truss/rafter (spaced a maximum of 24"inches o.c.) by 8d common nails spaced a maximum of 12" inches in the field.-OR- Any system of screws, nails, adhesives, other deck fastening system or truss/rafter spacing that is shown to have an equivalent or greater resistance 8d nails spaced a maximum of 12 inches in the field or has a mean uplift resistance of at least 103 psf.

Option C: Plywood/OSB roof sheathing with a minimum thickness of 7/16"inch attached to the roof truss/rafter (spaced a maximum of 24"inches o.c.) by 8d common nails spaced a maximum of 6" inches in the field. -OR- Dimensional lumber/Tongue & Groove decking with a minimum of 2 nails per board (or 1 nail per board if each board is equal to or less than 6 inches in width). –OR Any system of screws, nails, adhesives, other deck fastening system or truss/rafter spacing that is shown to have an equivalent or greater resistance than 8d common nails spaced a maximum of 6 inches in the field or has a mean uplift resistance of at least 182 psf

Option D: Reinforce Concrete Roof Deck

Option E: Other

Option F: Unknown or Unidentified

Option G: No Attic Access

4. Roof to Wall Attachment: This section described the way the trusses are attached to the main house structure. A minimum of three nails need to be used with every option other than toe nails.

Toe Nails are a single nail driven through the truss at an angle into the top plate of the supporting wall.

Clips are metal connectors that do not wrap over the top of the truss/rafter, or Metal connectors with a minimum of 1 strap that wraps over the top of the truss/rafter and does not meet the nail position requirements of C or D, but is secured with a minimum of 3 nails.

Single Wraps are metal connectors consisting of a single strap that wraps over the top of the truss/rafter and is secured with a minimum of 2 nails on the front side and a minimum of 1 nail on the opposing side.

Double Wraps are metal Connectors consisting of 2 separate straps that are attached to the wall frame, or embedded in the bond beam, on either side of the truss/rafter where each strap wraps over the top of the truss/rafter and is secured with a minimum of 2 nails on the front side, and a minimum of 1 nail on the opposing side, OR Metal connectors consisting of a single strap that wraps over the top of the truss/rafter, is secured to the wall on both sides, and is secured to the top plate with a minimum of three nails on each side.


 

Structural- Anchor bolts structurally connected or reinforced concrete roof.

5. Roof Geometry: This section describes the shape of the roof. If there are any other shapes other than hip over 10% of the total roof perimeter it will fall under the classification of other. It will only be classified under flat if it is roof on a building with 5 or more units where at least 90% of the main roof area has a roof slope of less than 2:12.

Hip roof is a roof that slopes upward from all sides of a structure, having no vertical ends. The hip is the external angle at which adjacent sloping sides of a roof meet. The degree of such an angle is referred to as the hip bevel. The triangular sloping surface formed by hips that meet at a roof's ridge is called a hip end. A pyramidal hipped roof, also known as a pavilion roof, is hipped equally at all corners and the hips meet at a single peak, but the more common form of hip roof is above a rectangular structure, where a roof ridge meets two hips at either end.

    This is a Hip Roof                       This is a Gable end of a roof

 

6. Secondary Water Resistance(SWR): Without documentation from a licensed roofer stating that this was installed it is difficult to verify without tearing up roofing material. Occasionally there might be a gap at a roof vent or ridge vent that the inspector will be able to see the SWR take a picture and verify its presence.

7. Opening Protection: The inspector is to verify the weakest form of protection. If your home has large missile impact rated windows and doors throughout the residence except one single opening you will receive no credit for the whole residence. All openings have to be covered by impact rated shutters or impact rated windows and doors. There has to be proof of this rating either a label present on the impact rated product or documentation that was provided when the products were purchased. Just because there is a stack of shutters in the garage or someone said your windows are hurricane rated does not mean that they are. Some windows are built to withstand certain pressures and windloads however are not IMPACT rated to withstand flying debris that become airborne in the event of a hurricane. Actual proof such as paper work from the installing company/builder with Florida Product Approval numbers or Miami-Dade Product approval number is necessary to properly complete this form.

 

HOPE THIS HELPS IN UNDERSTANDING YOUR WIND MITIGATION REPORT.

 

Comprehensive Building Inspections
www.bestinspector.com
239-481-3977

 

 

Information below was given to me by the one fo the States leading authority on Wind Mitigation Inspection and author of one of the largest text books on how to perform wind mitigations, John Shishilla.

Here is an example of measuring a home for a wind mitigation

The metal patio roof is not considered in the calculations because it is not structurally attached.

The roof perimeter is measured following the blue line

The non-hip roof is measured following the red line.

12 feet for non-hip divided by 166 feet for the perimeter is 7.2% non-hip.  This is less than the 10% threshold on the new wind mitigation form, therefor this house would be classified as a hip roof on the new wind mitigation form.

Measuring and calculating hip and Non-hip roofs

Here is an example of a simple hip/non-hip calculation for the 2012 1802 form

To measure the perimeter:

45+24+10+12+15+12+20+24 = 162′

To measure the non-hip(flat, structurally attached patio)

12+15+12= 39′

39′ / 162′ = 24%  = non-hip